This handbook is intended to serve as a resource for Directors of Undergraduate Studies and Assistants to Directors of Undergraduate Studies.

Academic Policies & Procedures: Students

PolicySummary
Arts and Letters Diploma Ceremony

The conferral of degrees takes place during the University Commencement Ceremony exercises, but students receive their diplomas during the College of Arts and Letters Diploma Ceremony.

Attendance

The policy governing excused and unexcused absences is in section 3.1 of the Undergraduate Academic Code.

Commencement

The conferral of degrees takes place during the University Commencement Ceremony exercises, but students receive their diplomas during the College of Arts and Letters Diploma Ceremony.

Course Load

A full-time course load in the College of Arts and Letters is 5 courses. The maximum number of credit hours per semester is 17. Maximum credit hours for all the colleges are located on the website of the Office of the Registrar. Sophomores may not overload. Overloads for juniors and seniors are allowed only with the permission of the deans in the Office for Undergraduate Studies and only during the designated days of the enrollment period in the first six days of each semester. Overloads for all the colleges are located on the website of the Office of the Registrar. Part-time status is defined as fewer than 12 credit hours per semester and is reserved for seniors in their final semester.

Dean's List

The Dean's List denotes students earning the top 30% of students in the College of Arts and Letters.  The grade point averages are calculated using the previous year's term GPAs. To be eligible for dean's honors, an undergraduate student must be registered for 12 graded credit hours.

Declare Major/Minor

Students should talk with the DUS before declaring a major or minor. Majors/minors are declared through a curriculum change eform.

Departmental Recognition Ceremony

As part of commencement, some departments hold their own recognition ceremonies. See individual departmental websites for details.

Discipline

College Honesty Committee The honesty committees advise and educate faculty and staff, as well as investigate and adjudicate potential Honor Code violations brought to their attention. The chair of the committee is the first point of contact for faculty. An Educational Outcome Report may be used for cases that, in the instructor’s judgment, may approach the level of a violation of the Honor Code, but that do not involve any apparent dishonesty and instead reflect a student’s misunderstanding of the conventional or appropriate usage of source materials. The university's Honor Code contains the rules governing academic dishonesty. A Procedural Appendix identifies the mechanisms and personnel responsible for implementing, supporting, and insuring adherence to the Honor CodeIf a student admits to having violated the academic code of Honor, and if that student and the instructor can agree on an appropriate punishment, the instructor should submit an Honesty Violation Report. The University Code of Honor Committee assists in the education of the Notre Dame community about academic integrity and the Academic Code of Honor. It also reviews standard penalties invoked for certain kinds of violations so that consistency and fairness may be maintained.

The procedures governing sexual harassment  sexual misconduct, dating violence, domestic violence, stalking, and conduct that creates a hostile environment are in the student handbook, Du Lac.

Double/Cross/Multi Counting

Double/Cross/Multi Counting. The College of Arts and Letters' policies governing the number of times a course may satisfy requirements at the college, university, and program level.

PINs

Rising sophomores receive their PINs (Personal Identification Numbers) for registration by their advising dean.  Upper level students receive PINs from program advisors. The DUS is sent a paper copy of PINs along with registration times to distribute to students (a single sheet for each student as well as a list of all students and PINs). Additionally, PINs are found in Banner under  SPAAPIN and “PIN Alpha Lists” placed on the R drive by the Registrar. Please note that faculty advisors do not receive the PINs. Following the formal registration period, students do not require PINs. Students who are studying abroad do not receive PINs from their departments—these students have a designated times and PINs from the Study Abroad office. Often students will approach administrative staff for PIN requests. Even though admins have access to PINs though Banner, students should meet with advisors in order to get PINs. It is in a student's best interest to be advised in the department and in the college every semester in order to be fully prepared to earn the major and a degree.

Privacy

The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) affords students certain rights with respect to their education records. The Office of the Registrar's directive on the Federal Education Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) can be found on their webpage.

Recruitment

The University has a “Majors Night”, where department representatives (almost always the DUS) have a chance to meet with students. Most often, students are Freshmen or Sophomores, but sometimes more advanced students, who might like a change or to pick up a minor, attend. First Year Studies also offers departments to participate in “Drinks on US”, an informal meet and greet. Reilly Scholars, Spring Visitation, Merit Scholars and International Scholars visit the campus over long weekends in late March and in April. The College of Arts and Letters has Academic Exploration Sessions during Monday afternoons of these visits. Early Admit Open House is held early in the spring semester for early action students. Representatives from all majors, minors, and academic units of the College of Arts and Letters take part. Welcome Weekend is held every fall to introduce parents and students to campus life. Representatives from all majors, minors, and academic units of the College of Arts and Letters take part.

Registration for Classes

The website of the Office of the Registrar contains information on how students register for classes. See also PINs.

Student Progress

Graduation Progress System (GPS) is a web-based advising tool accessible via insideND. It has been developed to increase our students’ awareness of the requirements of their degree. It is not designed to replace college or departmental advisors. Rather, it was designed to help advisors and students make more productive use of the time that they spend together. The DUS  will need to learn how to work in GPS and should schedule training with the Registrar’s office. It is part of the job of the DUS to make sure classes are counted correctly and know how to move classes when necessary.

Student Records

For information about individual students, see the Assistant Deans and Administrators in the Office for Undergraduate Studies. Basic information is available through Banner, Class Search, and Online Photo. These are available through InsideND.

Student Status

Academic Good Standing is the minimum semester Grade Point Average (GPA) for a student to maintain satisfactory academic progress. The rules governing academic good standing are in the Undergraduate Academic CodeAcademic Probation A student is placed on academic probation when their performance falls below the University's threshold for academic good standing. The rules governing academic probation are in the Undergraduate Academic Code. The rules governing dismissal from the university on academic grounds are in the Undergraduate Academic Code. A leave of absence may be granted to a student for their personal development (see the Undergraduate Academic Code). Students should contact their advising dean and the Registrar if they wish to pursue a leave of absence. A student should reapply for readmission to the College in which they intend to major, as long as they are in academic good standing. If a student is on probation or has academic dismissal status, they must reapply to the college in which they were enrolled at the time of dismissal. The rules governing readmission are in the Undergraduate Academic CodeA student wishing to withdraw from the university should contact their advising dean. The Separation from the University form must be completed and the student should meet with the Office of Student Affairs, but only after the dean or assistant dean has approved the separation eForm. When a student withdraws, the DUS is not notified, but the current professors teaching the student will be notified. The rules governing withdrawal are in the Undergraduate Academic Code.

Transfer Credit

The college policies governing transfer credit are on the Arts and Letters website. The university policies governing transfer credit are in sections 1.2.2 and 4.3 of the Undergraduate Academic Code. DUSs are often responsible for accepting classes from other universities as fulfilling departmental requirements. While the DUS does not decide on whether or not a particular university’s classes will be accepted, the DUS is usually the one who decides whether or not the content of a class fits with their department’s curriculum, under what specialization, and at what level.

Academic Policies & Procedures: Teaching

PolicySummary
Class Rosters

Class Rosters are available via Sakai, Online Photo, and in Class Search.

Conference Room Reservation Information

Reservations can be made through the Google calendar. See Conference Room Reservation for more information.

Examinations

The examination schedule is available on the website of the Office of the Registrar.

Faculty Handbooks

The Undergraduate Bulletin of Information is published each year to summarize the programs of study, the academic requirements, and the course offerings for Notre Dame undergraduate students, the Notre Dame Law School, and the Notre Dame Graduate School. Copies of Bulletins of Information from previous academic years are also available online in the university's archivesThe College Reference Guide is the most comprehensive reference guide to the policies and procedures in the College of Arts and Letters. Compiled by the Office of the Dean of the College, the guide is intended for chairpersons and faculty and contains information on hiring, undergraduate and graduate students, teaching, scheduling, enrollment management, budgets, space, stewardship, committees, communications, and honoria. The Faculty Handbook is a university resource that contains information relevant to faculty and academic administrators. This information includes the Mission Statement of the University, the Bylaws of the University, the Academic Articles, the Academic Code, and academic policies. Further resources for new faculty are on the Provost's website. ​​​​​​​The Guide to Undergraduate Teaching is compiled by the Office for Undergraduate Studies in the College of Arts and Letters and is intended to orientate faculty new to the College of Arts and Letters. It contains information on the structure of the college, best practices, regulations, and resources.

Forms

The college has a form for cancelling classes that have already been posted on the web, printed in the schedule of classes, or otherwise advertised as available to students. It is necessary to use this form to cancel under enrolled classes as well as classes that will not run for other reasons (e.g. faculty have left the university). The form for crosslisting​​​​​ new courses is available on the website of the Office of the Registrar. Online eForms for students separating from the university, adding or dropping classes, transfer course approval, taking a leave of absence, and changing curriculum (e.g. declaring a major/minor). Financial forms for procurement, requisitions and reimbursements are located on the website of the office of the Controller. Preferences for active learning spaces, computer labs, and specific, pedagogical needs may be requested prior to the start of course scheduling via Room Requests. For Fall, preferences are collected in late February. For the Spring semester, information is gathered in early October. Submit a preference by emailing roomreq@nd.edu. Once rooms are assigned, the Registrar's Office will work with instructors on a case-by-case basis. Changes are made based on room availability. To request a change in rooms, email roomreq@nd.edu.

Grades

Final Grades are reported by faculty to the Office of the Registrar. The Grade Change procedures governing grade changes are established by the Registrar and the scale for grading examinations and coursework can also be found through the Registrar. When an instructor initiates a grade change form, the chair, not the DUS approves the eForm. The form must also be approved by the student's advising dean. Grades which may be assigned but which are not included in the computation of the grade point average are listed on the website of the Office of the Registrar. The Office of the Registrar requests mid-term grades from instructors. Here is a tutorial on how to submit them. The university does not assign grades of “incomplete” to undergraduate students. An X grade is assigned rarely with the approval of an assistant dean if extenuating circumstances make it impossible for students to complete their work by the end of the term. X grades are meant to accommodate an acute, sudden, unforeseen family or medical emergency or service to the University that prevents a student from completing the last assignment(s) of a semester.

Graduation/Commencement

The conferral of degrees takes place during the University Commencement Ceremony exercises, but students receive their diplomas during the College of Arts and Letters Diploma Ceremony.

Hiring Instructors

The policies governing the hiring of instructors (adjuncts, regular faculty, or graduate students) are in The College Reference Guide. Further information is available in the Faculty Handbook.

Mission Statement

The Mission Statement defines Notre Dame's vision for undergraduate education.

Office Space

FurnishND is the primary avenue for faculty and staff to submit office furnishing requests. Many services are available to departments free of charge. The college has several rooms that may be reserved for a meeting. Meeting rooms are not to be used as classrooms. Reservations can be made through Google calendar.

Scheduling

Scheduling Classes is done using the CourseLeaf CLSS Course Planner Application. Access to the software is available through InsideND. The Registrar's website provides a list of the standard class times. The New Course Form is used to add a course which does not currently exist in the Course Catalog. New courses need to be approved by the Associate Dean for Undergraduate Studies. This electronic process is for all Main campus courses. Submission of the form sends it through the approval process. The form for crosslisting courses is available on the website of the Office of the Registrar.  A cross-listing is based on an existing course and so does not need the new course form. The college has a form for canceling classes that have already been posted on the web, printed in the schedule of classes, or otherwise advertised as available to students. It is necessary to use this form to cancel under enrolled classes as well as classes that will not run for other reasons (e.g. faculty have left the university). Course attributes are system codes used to categorize sections of courses for two purposes: (1) the fulfillment of academic requirements in the University of Notre Dame’s degree audit software known as G.P.S. (the Graduation Progress System), and (2) the administrative sorting of courses for purposes such as final exam scheduling and bulletin publishing. The assignment of course attributes to sections is managed by the Office of the Registrar in coordination with the academic programs at the University. Many course attributes can be used as search criteria in the online Class Search. A glossary of course attribute definitions is available on the website of the Office for the Registrar. This resource details the course number policies currently in use at the University of Notre Dame from Summer 2005 to present and the previous guidelines used from 1970 through Spring 2005. There are opportunities for team teaching in the College and in the university core curriculum. Team teaching in the college requires that both instructors are usually present in the classroom throughout the semester, and will count towards the instructor's teaching load as if it were a normal course. The TUSC Process Timeline is provided each semester as a way for departments to quickly review the deadlines for submission of course information. New courses (courses that do not have a code assigned to them) should be submitted for approval by the Associate Dean for Undergraduate Studies here

Semesters

The Academic Calendar, past, present, and future, are available on the website of the Office of the Registrar. Fall Semester and Spring Semester class searches are available through class search. The details of the various types of programs available during the summer semester are on the website of the Office of the Registrar and through class search. The Summer Service Learning Program (SSLP) is run by the Center for Social Concerns.  Online courses are also available.

Teaching Rooms

Detailed information on classrooms is available through the room reservations website. General purpose room information is available on the Registrar's website.  The College is assigned a fixed number of room allocations that are available during teaching hours and must not exceed this allocation.  A specific room request for active learning spaces, computer labs, and specific, pedagogical needs may be indicated prior to the start of course scheduling. For Fall, preferences are collected in late February. For the Spring semester, information is gathered in early October. Submit a preference by emailing roomreq@nd.edu. Once rooms are assigned, the Registrar's Office will work with instructors on a case-by-case basis. Changes are made based on room availability. To request a change in rooms, email roomreq@nd.edu.

Trips Off Campus

For class sponsored student travel make sure all University procedures are followed. The Office of Risk Management has the information needed. Helpful Tools for Faculty Travel: Faculty Tools to Use from NDI's Travel website.

University Policies

The Academic Articles define the structure of academic governance at the university. The Faculty Handbook contains details of the charter, statutes and bylaws of the university. Faculty and academic administrators may be subject to other policies, procedures, and guidelines, which may include those of colleges, departments, and administrative units. For information about college or department policies/procedures and how these policies/procedures relate to the general policies contained here, please contact your dean’s office or your department chair. The Undergraduate Academic Code contains the university regulations that govern the attainment of academic credit and degrees. The Undergraduate Academic Code of Honor contains the university's process for maintaining academic integrity.

Academic Support Units

PolicySummary
Center for Creative Computing

The Center for Creative Computing provides resources to support and encourage specialized and advanced computing technologies in the arts, humanities and social sciences. The Center fosters initiatives in research and teaching that seek new paradigms of literacy through a critical and creative exploration of emerging forms of visual communication. The CCC is committed to the cross-disciplinary exchange of ideas and skills for the purpose of encouraging artistic collaboration, faculty research and curricular innovation.

Center for Digital Scholarship

The Navari Center for Digital Scholarship leverages state-of-the art technologies, enabling students and faculty to explore new methodologies, analyze complex data and share research results in ways never before possible. The Navari Center is committed to transforming teaching, research and scholarship at Notre Dame.

Center for the Study of Languages and Cultures

The Center for the Study of Languages and Cultures supports language and cultural acquisition through a broad array of programs including Peer Tutoring, Summer Language Abroad, and English for Academic Purposes. In addition, the Center maintains a wide array of languages resources (including a language library), hosts language events, and conducts research to explore ways technology can enhance language acquisition.

Communications

The Office of Communications promotes the many activities and accomplishments of the College’s students, faculty, administrators, and staff. This unit offers a variety of editorial, and creative services as well as referrals when unable to take on projects in-house.

Computing & Instructional Technology for Faculty

The Campus Workstation Program (CWP) provides funds for new computers for eligible faculty and staff. Document Delivery is for Notre Dame faculty, students and staff to request articles, books and book chapters from the Hesburgh Libraries' collections through  the online catalog. Articles, papers, and book chapters will be delivered electronically to faculty, staff, and graduate students (unless delivery in paper format is requested). All Notre Dame faculty, staff and students can request books to be held for them at the library front desk. Notre Dame faculty and staff may request books to be delivered to their departments. The Interlibrary Loan is also available for Notre Dame faculty, students and staff to request articles, books, media, and more from other libraries when the Hesburgh Libraries do not have what they need. The Library Reserves offer digital The library reserve can integrate with the Sakai course platform. Instructors may place library books or personal books on hard copy reserve. Access to items in Notre Dame's Electronic Reserves system is restricted to students enrolled in the course for which the reserve reading is assigned. Instructors can place videos on reserve. A copy can be made available on reserve in the audio visual center or they can be streamed into Sakai. Using the Library Reserves tool can help protect instructors from violating copyright. The reserve staff can help connect instructors with resources within the library's collection and will help with making fair use assessments of existing content. They can also help acquire the rights to the content that is not housed in the collection. The Office for Information Technology (OIT) provides IT support to affiliated members of the ND community. The Arts and Letters Computing Office (ALCO) provides additional support. Sakai is the online platform for placing teaching materials and assessments for individual courses. Sakai is a collaborative learning environment that provides instructors with tools to support teaching and learning. The OIT's ND Studios team offers a variety of Video-streaming services to record and produce digital media for academic lectures, academic events, and other campus activities, including: audio and video recording services, audio and video editing, live streaming: delivery of multimedia content live over the internet, and delivery of multimedia content via the internet.

Flatley Center for Undergraduate Scholarly Engagement

The Flatley Center for Undergraduate Scholarly Engagement (CUSE) promotes the intellectual development of our undergraduates through scholarly engagement, research, creative endeavors, and the pursuit of national and international fellowships.

Institute for Scholarship in the Liberal Arts

The Institute for Scholarship in the Liberal Arts (ISLA) supports and promotes the research, scholarship, and creative endeavors of University of Notre Dame faculty, graduate students, and undergraduates in the College of Arts and Letters.

Kaneb Center for Teaching and Learning

The Kaneb Center supports the pursuit of teaching excellence by stimulating scholarly reflection and conversation about teaching and encouraging the adoption of practices that enhance learning.

The Presenter Center

The Writing Center’s Presenter Center offers free, one-on-one consultations with individuals or groups giving presentations in any setting, from classes to conferences, and for any purpose, from business pitches to wedding toasts. From beginning an outline of your speech to putting the final touches on your presentation, the Presenter Center is available to assist students in the creative process of presenting their work.

The Writing Center

The Writing Center at the University of Notre Dame is dedicated to helping students become better writers. Our tutors accomplish this goal by listening attentively in writing conferences, reading papers carefully, and asking questions that can help writers better express their ideas and construct their arguments. Writing Center tutors work with writers during all stages of the writing process  — from understanding an assignment, to developing a thesis, to organizing the paper, to revising the final product.

Curriculum

PolicySummary
Arts and Letters Requirements

The degree in the College of Arts and Letters requires at least 122 degree-countable credit hours, which must include completion of all university requirements, College of Arts and Letters requirements and the requirements for at least one major.

Committees on Curriculum and Teaching

The purpose of the Academic Council is described in Article IV, Section 3(a) of the Academic Articles as follows: The principal functions of the council are to determine general academic policies and regulations of the University; to approve major changes in the requirements for admission to and graduation from the Colleges and Schools and in the programs of study offered by Colleges, schools, and departments; to authorize the establishment, modification, or discontinuance of any academic organization or degree program of the University; and to provide for review, amendment, and final interpretation of the academic articles, without prejudice to article V. The decisions of the council are by majority vote and are subject to the approval of the President. Minutes of the meetings are located on the Council's website.

The Arts and Letters College Council consists of an equal number of ex officio and elected members. The ex officio members of each College Council consist of the Dean of the College, Associate and Assistant deans, the Chairpersons of all departments under the jurisdiction of the College, and any other administrators designated by the respective College Council. The Council is an advisory body to the Dean. All regular faculty of the College are eligible to vote for, and be elected as, representatives. Representatives serve staggered three-year terms. The College Council also has student representatives selected according to procedures, numbers, and terms decided by the Council. The Council discusses the policies of the college. Minutes of the meetings are located on the Council's website. The College of Arts and Letters Undergraduate Studies Committee recommends new policies concern undergraduate programs for discussion at College Council and for approval by the Dean. 

The university's core curriculum is overseen by the university-level Core Curriculum Committee of faculty supported by subcommittees of domain experts and stakeholders that will formulate and enact procedures for course approval. There are 11 core curriculum subcommittees (one for each of the Ways of Knowing).

The College of Arts and Letters Honesty Committee advises faculty and staff, as well as investigates and adjudicates potential Honor Code violations brought to their attention. The chairs of the committee are the first point of contact for faculty.

The University Code of Honor Committee assists in the education of the Notre Dame community about academic integrity and the Academic Code of Honor. It also reviews standard penalties invoked for certain kinds of violations so that consistency and fairness may be maintained.

First Year

First Year of Studies processes all credit and placement students receive based on Advanced Placement, standardized test scores or on their performance on Notre Dame placement examinations, as well as any transfer credit they might receive for college-level work completed at other institutions. The colleges and their departments in coordination with the First Year of Studies, determine what credit or placement will be awarded based on prior work and/or examination results. Approved credit is entered on the official transcript maintained in the Registrar’s Office. All students must take the required writing courses and the Moreau First Year Experience in the first year. Other core curriculum courses may be taken as well. In addition to the courses students may take to satisfy the core curriculum requirements, there may courses required by an intended major that also need to be addressed in the first year.

Majors and Minors

Undergraduates in the College of Arts and Letters can choose from a wide range of different academic majors and minors offered by the College’s many departments and interdisciplinary programs. Majors in the College are usually 10 courses/30 credits. Supplementary majors are usually 8 courses/24 credits. Minors are usually 5 courses/15 credits.

Senior Thesis/Honors Thesis

The Senior Thesis/Honors Thesis works one-on-one with a faculty adviser on an original research or creative endeavor that showcases your intellectual growth and serves as the culmination of your undergraduate career. Students often come to the DUS for advice on choosing a thesis advisor. Some departments hold information sessions for students who are interested in learning about the thesis process and also how to get funding. 

Study Abroad

Notre Dame faculty are invited to propose and plan a credit-bearing Faculty Led Study Abroad Program with the assistance of Notre Dame International. Notre Dame's Global Gateways provide academic and intellectual hubs where scholars, students, and leaders from universities, government, business, and community gather to discuss, discover, and debate issues of topical and enduring relevance. Notre Dame's Global Centers are focused on academic and cultural exchange encompassing a more defined geographical area than the Global Gateways. Global Centers offer more focused academic programs; involve faculty members on an ongoing basis from select disciplines; host or organize a specific range of academic conferences and events; and represent the University to academic partners, governments, foundations, corporations, international and community-based organizations, and the community of alumni and parents primarily in that location. In addition to the Study Abroad programs, there are many ways for students to internationalize their Notre Dame experience, including independent research, language programs, internships, and service learningSemester Abroad Approval Guidelines for study abroad approval are available on the Office for Undergraduate Studies website. Notre Dame students are encouraged to consider the opportunities for study abroad that are offered through Notre Dame International - Study Abroad. Students may choose from over 40 locations in more than 20 countries around the world. The cost for University-sponsored programs includes Notre Dame tuition and on-campus room and meals, as well as other expenses related to studying abroad. The Study Abroad Courses list is generated by The Office of the Registrar. The Center for the Study of Languages & Cultures’ annual Summer Language Abroad (SLA) Grant Program provides funding for individual summer foreign language study. A list of international programs approved by Notre Dame can be found here.

 

In order for a student to get approved to study abroad, the student is required to meet with the DUS to discuss their study plan—making sure they can study abroad and still complete all requirements. The DUS is also responsible for deciding whether or not classes taught abroad can count for credit in their departments and also for numbering the class. The DUS also needs to advise students who are studying abroad. 

Undergraduate Research

The Flatley Center for Undergraduate Scholarly Engagement (CUSE) can help find funding for many different kinds of undergraduate research to help make the most of the Notre Dame experience and expand intellectual life at the University. The unit offers a range of grants to enable students to participate in professional development that will have an impact on their academic and/or career goals.

University Core Requirements

Central to undergraduate education at the University of Notre Dame is the core curriculum, a set of requirements that apply to all students, regardless of major.

University Undergraduate Programs

The production of the Undergraduate Bulletin is managed by the Office of the Registrar. 

Faculty and Student Prizes and Awards

PolicySummary
Faculty Awards

Charles E. Sheedy, C.S.C. Excellence in Teaching Award is presented annually to an outstanding teacher in the College of Arts and Letters. The Rev. Edmund P. Joyce, C.S.C., Award for Excellence in Undergraduate Teaching annually honors up to 20 faculty members who have had a profound influence on the undergraduate learning experience, elevated students’ intellectual engagement, and fostered students’ ability to express themselves effectively within a disciplinary context. The Dockweiler Award for Excellence in Undergraduate Advising recognizes three full-time faculty or exempt staff who demonstrate a sustained commitment to undergraduates through outstanding mentoring, academic advising, or career counseling. The Reinhold Niebuhr Award is given annually to a faculty member or administrator whose body of academic work (e.g., articles, books, creative works) and life promote or exemplify the area of social justice in modern life. The Grenville Clark Award is given to a faculty member or administrator whose voluntary activities serve to advance the cause of peace and human rights. The Presidential Award is given to a member of the faculty and/or the administration for distinguished service to the University over an extended period of time. The Thomas P. Madden Award honors that member of the faculty who contributed the most to the teaching of first-year students. The Research Achievement Award honors a distinguished faculty member who has made significant contributions to scholarship in his or her discipline and to the research and graduate education goals of the University.

Scholarships

The University of Notre Dame offers a limited number of merit scholarships to admitted first-year domestic and international students. Recipients demonstrate exceptional accomplishment, leadership, commitment to service, and intellectual promise. Financial need is not a factor unless otherwise noted.  Merit scholarships are renewable for four years of undergraduate study pending satisfactory academic performance and program participation. These expectations are detailed to scholarship recipients. Scholars are invited to participate in enrichment opportunities as an additional benefit of their awards. The Flatley Center for Undergraduate Scholarly Engagement promotes the intellectual development of undergraduates through scholarly engagement, research, creative endeavors, and the pursuit of fellowships.

Student Accolades

Latin Honors are granted by college/school to those undergraduate students who graduate in the top 30% of their college/school. Those who graduate in the top 30% of their college/school receive cum laude (honors); those in the top 15% of their college/school receive magna cum laude (high honors); and those in the top 5% of their college/school receive summa cum laude (highest honors). 

The Dean's List are students achieving the minimum term grade point for dean’s honors in each college and represent the top 30 percent of students in that college. These grade point averages are calculated using the previous year’s term GPAs. To be eligible for dean’s honors, an undergraduate student must be enrolled in 12 graded credit hours.

Student Awards

The Rev. A. Leonard Collins, C.S.C., Award annually honors a graduating senior who has expended substantial personal effort to advance the interests of students at Notre Dame.

The Sister Jean Lenz, O.S.F. Leadership Award annually honors a post-baccalaureate student who has displayed leadership in promoting a more diverse, inclusive campus community for students.

The Rev. Theodore M. Hesburgh, C.S.C. Award annually honors a graduating senior whose contributions have signifcantly advanced the climate of welcome and inclusion within or beyond the University community.

The Blessed Basil Moreau, C.S.C., Leadership Award honors a graduating senior at Notre Dame who embodies Fr. Moreau’s vision of educating both the heart and mind, and who has demonstrated significant effort to advance the Catholic character of the University.

The John W. Gardner Student Leadership Award annually honors a student who exemplifies the ideals of the University through outstanding volunteer service beyond the University community.

The Mike Russo Spirit Award honors an outstanding undergraduate student who exemplifies the qualities for which Mike Russo was known, including service, personal character, and those who strive to bring about the best in themselves and others. 

The Ray Siegfried Award for Leadership Excellence will be awarded annually to a senior at Notre Dame who exemplifies the qualities for which Notre Dame Trustee Ray Siegfried was known, including leadership, generosity, devotion to the Catholic faith, and affinity for athletics.  

The Denny Moore Award for Excellence in Journalism is awarded annually to a senior at Notre Dame who exemplifies the qualities for which Denny Moore was known, including personal integrity and character, commitment to Notre Dame, and writing ability.  

The Rev. John Francis "Pop" Farley, C.S.C. Award honors an individual that has demonstrated distinguished service to student life at the University of Notre Dame.

The Research Like A Champion (RLAC) Program is a collaborative effort between the College of Science and Harper Cancer Research Institute (HCRI) to drive innovation in cancer research. Winning project proposals receive a Research Like a Champion Grant that provides support throughout the academic year and summer. 

The annual Undergraduate Library Research Award (ULRA) is awarded to undergraduate students whose essay submission demonstrates excellent research skills that utilize a breadth of library resources, collections, and services for their research and creative projects.

The Department of Africana Studies awards seek to recognize excellence in the literary, performing, media, industrial, and heritage arts.

Several awards are given annually to outstanding students in American Studies and The Gallivan Program in Journalism, Ethics, and Democracy

At the end of the academic year,the Department of Anthropology awards outstanding anthropology majors in various categories.

There are numerous funding opportunities in the Department of Art, Art History & Design to support student coursework, special projects, and career advancement.

The Department of East Asian Languages and Cultures gives out awards annually at the department graduation ceremony to those students who best exemplify scholarly achievement. 

The Economics Department presents awards for the best theses in Economics and International Economics.

The Department of English gives out various awards each year.

The Department of Film, Television and Theatre gives out several awards each year for outstanding work in file, television and threatre.

The Gender Studies Program acknowledges outstanding students through writing awards; the Joan Aldous Praxis Award; internship grants; and thesis grants.  

The Department of German and Russian gives out several departmental awards annually to outstanding students.

Students are eligible annually for several awards given by the Department of History.

The Department of Irish Language and Literature gives out awards annually for excellence in Irish Language and Literature.

The Kroc Institute for International Peace Studies bestows the Yarrow Award in Peace Studies and the Peace Studies Senior Seminar Essay award each year.

Latino Studies annually presents an outstanding student each year with the Best Paper in Latino Studies award.

The Program of Liberal Studies annually gives various awards to outstanding students.

Students in the Medieval Institute undergraduate programs take part in internships, lectures, research projects, and study abroad (especially at the University of St. Andrews in Scotland.  They are also eligible to complete for the Robert M. Conway Prize, an annual award given for an outstanding paper written on a medieval topic.

The Department of Philosophy presents two student awards annually.

The Department of Political Science awards outstanding Political Science students various annual awards. 

The Department of Romance Languages and Literatures offers honors opportunities and several awards to exemplary students.

Awards for Notre Dame’s most outstanding sociology majors are given annually by the Department of Sociology

Each year the Department of Theology presents awards to the most outstanding graduating seniors.

Grants to Support Teaching

PolicySummary
Equipment Restoration and Renewal Grants

The Equipment Restoration and Renewal (ERR) program assists in the restoration, replacement, and renewal of the facilities needed for faculty research, scholarship, and creative endeavor.

Meal Ticket Program

Meal tickets are available to faculty members and TAs who wish to join their students for lunch or dinner in either North or South Dining Hall. Tickets may be obtained only in person at the Office for Undergraduate Studies in 104 O’Shaughnessy Hall. Faculty and TAs charged with teaching their own undergraduate classes may request a maximum of five lunch or dinner tickets per term.

Table Talk Program

The purpose of Table Talk is to encourage interaction between undergraduate students and faculty over a shared meal, in a relaxed social setting. The fund is designed to assist faculty (not including TAs. Graduate students who are instructor of record ARE eligible) with the costs of entertaining students in their homes or other appropriate venues where there will not be interruptions from other students or groups. Accordingly, Table Talk is not intended for bringing treats into the classroom. You may request one reimbursement per class, per semester.

Teaching Beyond the Classroom Grants

Teaching Beyond the Classroom (TBC) Grants provide funding to faculty and graduate students in support of cultural excursions and academic experiences aimed at enhancing teaching and student learning beyond the classroom.  The TBC Major Grants (up to $20,000) and Mid-Size Grants (up to $5,000) are open to regular faculty in the College of Arts and Letters. The TBC Small Interim Grants (Faculty) provide funding up to $1,500 and are open to all faculty, including adjunct and visiting professors. Additionally, the TBC Small Interim Grants (Graduate Students) provide funding to graduate students teaching undergraduate classes who want to take students to on-campus performances.

Interdisciplinary Institutes

PolicySummary
Center for Social Concerns

The Center for Social Concerns provides community-based learning courses, community-based research, and service opportunities for students and faculty and lies at the heart of the University of Notre Dame.

Eck Institute for Global Health

The University of Notre Dame's Eck Institute for Global Health is a university-wide enterprise that recognizes health as a fundamental human right and endeavors to promote research, training, and service to advance health standards for all people, especially people in low and middle-income countries, who are disproportionately impacted by preventable diseases.

Harper Cancer Research Institute

The Harper Cancer Research Institute (HCRI) researchers are dedicated to conducting innovative and integrative research that confronts the complex challenges of cancer. From common malignancies to rare and recalcitrant cancers, researchers at the University of Notre Dame and Indiana University School of Medicine - South Bend are united in multi-disciplinary teams with a common goal: to increase the survival of all patients diagnosed with cancer. 

Institute for Church Life

The McGrath Institute for Church Life partners with Catholic dioceses, parishes and schools to address pastoral challenges with theological depth and rigor. By connecting the Catholic intellectual life to the life of the Church, the Institute forms faithful Catholic leaders for service to the Church and the world.

Institute for Educational Initiatives

The Institute for Educational Initiatives strives to improve the education of all youth, particularly the disadvantaged. Its teaching, scholarship, and service reflect Notre Dame's commitment to advance K-12 schooling.

Institute for Latino Studies

The Institute for Latino Studies advances understanding of the fastest-growing and youngest population in the United States and in the U.S. Catholic Church. ILS strengthens Notre Dame’s mission to prepare transformative leaders in education, the professions, the arts, economic and civic participation, faith, and family life among Latinos and all members of our society.

Kellogg Institute for International Studies

The Kellogg Institute creates a space where those interested in international affairs can engage—with one another and with issues crucial to human society. Known for its regional focus on Latin America, the Institute has in recent years widened its scope to include Africa, Asia, and beyond. 

Keough-Naughton Institute for Irish Studies

The Keough-Naughton Institute for Irish Studies is a teaching-and-research institute within Notre Dame's Keough School of Global Affairs dedicated to the study and understanding of Irish culture—in Ireland and around the world—in all of its manifestations.

Kroc Institute for International Peace Studies

The University of Notre Dame's Kroc Institute for International Peace Studies is one of the world's leading centers for the study of the causes of violent conflict and strategies for sustainable peace. Kroc Institute faculty and fellows conduct interdisciplinary research on a wide range of topics related to peace and justice.

Liu Institute for Asia and Asian Studies

The Liu Institute for Asia and Asian Studies provides a forum for integrated and multi-disciplinary research and teaching on Asia. It supports innovative projects that actively combine teaching, research, and social engagement, creating a unique model of rounded education on Asia. The Institute also promotes general awareness, understanding, and knowledge of Asia, through organizing public events and supporting student and faculty scholarship, as well as interaction and exchanges with partners in Asia. 

Medieval Institute

The Medieval Institute promotes research and teaching on the multiple cultures, languages, and religions of the medieval period. Offering both undergraduate and Ph.D. programs, the Institute facilitates the activities of the largest contingent of medievalists at any North American university. 

Nanovic Institute for European Studies

The mission of the Nanovic Institute for European Studies is to enrich the intellectual culture of Notre Dame by creating an integrated, interdisciplinary home for students and faculty to explore the evolving ideas, cultures, beliefs, and institutions that shape Europe today. To pursue its mission, the Institute works to promote European studies at Notre Dame, transform its undergraduates, professionalize its graduate students, foster its interdisciplinary faculty research, and build its international network.

Tantur Ecumenical Institute for Theological Studies

The Tantur Ecumenical Institute has developed several different Programs and Special Courses to serve those seeking to deepen their understanding of this land, its history, its culture, its people and their own faith. The Continuing Education Programs are designed for those who are members of a Christian community, whether as priests, pastors, educators or lay people. 

Print and Web Communications

PolicySummary
Design, Copy and Logistic Services (DCL)

Design, Copy and Logistic Services (DCL) provides many services on campus.  They can assist with copy equipment for A&L Departments; convert pdf files into an editable MSWord document; faxes; provide master keys for A&L offices in Decio/Malloy Buildings; supply Scantron Forms and Tests Results; assist with scanning color and black/white files into .pdf/.jpg/.tif files; and provide typing Services for A&L faculty members.

Office of Communications

The Office of Communications promotes the many activities and accomplishments of the College’s students, faculty, administrators, and staff. This unit offers a variety of editorial, and creative services as well as referrals when unable to take on projects in-house.

Posters Display Policy

It has always been the College’s culture to allow posters to be placed throughout O’Shaughnessy Hall by departments, student groups, human resources, etc. In addition to providing valuable information, posters add to the vibe and eclectic feel of the College’s central administrative building – O’Shaughnessy Hall. Since January 1, 2015, Arts and Letters departments are required to include an expiration date on the bottom right hand corner of posters being hung in O’Shaughnessy. Posters may be hung anywhere throughout the building – preferably on the bulletin boards - but may not be taped or tacked to any of the wooded walls. No posters or other hangings will be allowed in the Great Hall of O’Shaughnessy. Departments are responsible for removing posters that have expired. Posters left hanging beyond the expiration date or beyond the event date when no expiration is provided may be removed and discarded by the College. All posters are to remain untouched until the expiration or event date being advertised is passed. This policy has been established to ensure that posters are current and relevant. The policy is also intended to make those hanging posters responsible for their timely removal.

The Center for Creative Computing

The Center for Creative Computing (CCC)  provides leadership and resources to support and encourage specialized and advanced computing technologies in the arts, humanities and social sciences. The Center fosters initiatives in research and teaching that seek new paradigms of literacy through a critical and creative exploration of emerging forms of visual communication. The CCC is committed to the cross-disciplinary exchange of ideas and skills for the purpose of encouraging artistic collaboration, faculty research and curricular innovation.

Program Evaluation

PolicySummary
Academic Program Reviews

The purpose of academic program reviews is two-fold: to ensure advancement and maintenance of excellent academic programs, and to provide regular opportunities for academic programs to plan for the future. At Notre Dame, this is achieved through a four-step process involving internal reflection (a unit’s self-study), consultation with external experts, the development of an action plan, and the ongoing monitoring of progress.

Accreditation

The Department of Psychology is accredited by the American Psychological Association (APA)* and the Department of Theology is accredited by the Association of Theological Schools (ATS).  The Criteria for Accreditation are the standards of quality by which the Commission determines whether an institution merits accreditation or reaffirmation of accreditation. 

State Authorization

The State of Indiana adopted a Charter in 1844 establishing the University of Notre Dame du Lac and giving State Authorization to the University as an institution of higher education. The University is also authorized by name by the State of Indiana through statute (Indiana Code 21-7-13-6). 

Role of the DUS

PolicySummary
Directories and Lists

The two most important contact lists for the DUS are the Directors of Undergraduate Studies List, which is maintained by the Office for Undergraduate Studies and the Deans and Chairpersons List which is maintained by the Provost's Office. It is important that these are kept up to date. An additional list that will be helpful is the list of acronyms.

Role and Responsibilities of the DUS

The role of the DUS in the College of Arts and Letters is multifaceted and varies considerably across departments. The DUS attends to numerous small details on a daily basis, always keeping in mind the overall goals of their individual departments as well as the vision of the university as a whole. Additionally, the DUS stands as a representative of the department and is key to the recruitment process. While the administrative demands of class scheduling, crosslisting, course approval and advising are central, the DUS is also a vital source of support for individual students, providing guidance, information and care in many ways and on many levels.

Role of the Advising Deans

Advising deans serve as a resource for students and offices in the college and across the university, upholding and maintaining the standards inherent in the Academic Code. They empower students to be lifelong, self-directed learners by mentoring and encouraging them to explore opportunities in research, publication, international education and scholarship and to identify their strengths in considering potential career paths.  Their role is to promote an appreciation of collegiate education as an opportunity for exploration, contemplation, and intellectual engagement by providing and directing students to resources. They work cooperatively with other campus entities to inspire students to develop ethical standards and values for life. The advising deans' overarching goal is to achieve unsurpassed excellence in the guidance and nurturing of undergraduate students during their intellectual and spiritual journeys as members of the Notre Dame community.

Student Academic Advising

PolicySummary
Arts and Letters Advising Deans

The Office for Undergraduate Studies, 104 O’Shaughnessy Hall, is open weekdays from 8 a.m.–5 p.m. Stop by or call 574.631.7098 for an appointment with your advising dean.  Meet the Advising Deans

DUS Advising

For information about individual students, see the Assistant Deans and Administrators in the Office for Undergraduate Studies. Academic Services for Student Athletes (ASSA) will provide lists of students and practice times  for scheduling required classes. InsideND is a valuable resource.  Here you can access Banner which is the main database for students and for processing overrides to get into classes.  You can also get your class roster to see which students are registered in your classes.  Class Search allows you to search for courses by semester, department, attribute, and credits. Lists instructors, meeting times, rooms, class size, restrictions, section numbers, CRNs, and location. GPS (Graduation Progress System) tracks the fulfillment of each students department, college, and university requirements.  The Grad Admin provides a list of students who have submitted their names for graduation, which DUSs need to approve. And the Online Photo tab provides instructors with a list and photo of each student in their classes.

First Year Advising

The First Year Advising team places students in classes in their first semester and works one-on-one with students to begin their academic plan and to explore possibilities for majors.

Student Support

PolicySummary
Campus Life

Residential life has a rich tradition at the University of Notre Dame. The Office of Community Standards educates the campus community on expectations for student conduct and administers formative and developmentally-based opportunities rooted in the Holy Cross tradition to challenge students to reflect on their choices, take responsibility for their actions, and understand the balance between the needs of the individual as well as the University community.

Careers

The Center for Career Development coordinates a broad range of career-related services for all undergraduate students. The center coordinates a broad range of career-related services for all undergraduate students.

Disability Services - Sara Bea Center for Students with Disabilities

The Sara Bea Disability Services coordinates the process by which qualified students with disabilities can request and receive reasonable accommodations.

Harassment and Assault

Sexual harassment, which includes sexual assault and sexual misconduct, is a form of sex discrimination which is prohibited under Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972. Dating violence, domestic violence and stalking could also be considered forms of sex discrimination. Because of the seriousness of these offenses, the University has adopted specific policies and procedures.

Health and Counseling

The McDonald Center for Student Well-Being strategically assesses the environment and creates structures for wellness enhancement and risk reduction. Using evidence-based practices and collaborating with a range of campus partners, they work collectively to provide initiatives, services, and resources that support the eight dimensions of well-being. The Center can also offer help to students struggling with pregnancy, eating disorders, and gambling. Student Health and Wellness. A guide to student life for overall health and wellness. The University Counseling Center is accredited by the International Association of Counseling Services, provides confidential short-term counseling and crisis intervention services to eligible Notre Dame students and consultation and outreach services to members of the Notre Dame community. University Health Services has a variety of health resources that reside right here on Notre Dame’s campus. Wellness Center provides services to faculty, staff, graduate students and their respective spouses/dependents.

 

Additionally, students may benefit from the support of Care Consultants who can assess the health and safety of the student and campus communities and recommend services and resources that will support the student’s ability to succeed at the university.  Faculty and staff with concerns about a student's well-being may speak with the Arts & Letter Care Consultant and make a referral.

Standards of Conduct

Notre Dame students are held to high standards in all areas of their life. du Lac: A Guide to Student Life is a central resource for information for students enrolled at the University of Notre Dame. The Office of Community Standards educates the campus community on expectations for student conduct and administers formative and developmentally-based opportunities rooted in the Holy Cross tradition to challenge students to reflect on their choices, take responsibility for their actions, and understand the balance between the needs of the individual as well as the University community.

University Resources

PolicySummary
Catering

University Catering is the preferred choice for providing food services for events and occasions on Notre Dame's campus.

Diversity

The University of Notre Dame promotes a spirit of diversity among undergraduates, and inclusion through academic inquiry, and programs and opportunities that reflect our foundational belief in the dignity of all men and women. The Office of the President offers broader oversight of diversity at Notre Dame.  Notre Dame is a community rich in collaboration, inclusion, and belonging. The Office of Multicultural Student Programs and Services administers the programs and services specifically designed to assist with the retention and the academic success of traditionally underrepresented students. The University Committee on Women Faculty and Students (UCWFS) serves in an advisory capacity reporting to the president through the provost. The Gender Relations Center (GRC), an office within the Division of Student Affairs, promotes moral formation consistent with Catholic identity, mission and values in an effort to create a healthy culture at the University of Notre Dame. PrismND is Notre Dame’s first and only official LGBTQ student organization. International Student and Scholar Affairs (ISSA) is a part of Notre Dame International. It supports and advises international students and scholars at the University of Notre Dame. The Office of Institutional Equity is committed to promoting an equitable educational and work environment that is free from discrimination, harassment, and retaliation in accordance with Title VII of The Civil Rights Act of 1964, Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972, the Age Discrimination in Employment Act, the Americans with Disabilities Act, other applicable federal and state laws, and University policy. The Office of Institutional Equity also strives to foster an inclusive campus environment that embraces the talents and achievements of all individuals regardless of race, color, national or ethnic origin, religion, sex, sexual orientation, disability, veteran status, age, or genetic information.

Financial

The Finance Division works to further the mission of the University by providing important financial services to many constituencies, including students, faculty and staff.

Human Resources

Human Resources is dedicated to making Notre Dame the workplace of choice by creating and fostering an environment which allows the University to attract, hire, and retain the best people.

Office of Student Enrichment

The Office of Student Enrichment is a place that offers programming and potential resources for members of the Notre Dame community who identify with the first-generation college and/or low-income student experience.

Pastoral

​​​​​​The Office of Campus Ministry is committed to cultivating the faith of all Notre Dame students. It has put into place a Pastoral Plan for the Support and Holistic Development of GLBTQ and Heterosexual Students at the University of Notre Dame.

Safety and Security

The Office of Campus Safety is comprised of the Notre Dame Security Police Department (NDSP), the Notre Dame Fire Department (NDFD), the Office of Risk Management & Safety, and the University’s Emergency Preparedness and Business Continuity programs. The Notre Dame Security Police provide exceptional services that promote a safe and well ordered environment for the Notre Dame community.  The University of Notre Dame Fire Department (NDFD) is dedicated to the preservation of life and property and to the promotion of fire safety through public education, inspections and fire protection system maintenance.  Additionally, The Risk Management & Safety Department (RMS) is dedicated to providing quality service and professional advice in the areas of safety, occupational health, environmental protection, and risk management. 

Transportation

There are many forms of transportation available for students, faculty and staff.  Notre Dame has put in place bicycle use rules to ensure safe and courteous operation of bicycles.  Limebikes have been added on the campus to provide an alternative to walking the campus.  In addition, the University offers Zipcar, the world's leading car-sharing service. Transpo operated a designated bus stop system and drops off and picks-up at the designated bus stop locations. Lastly, Notre Dame provides campus shuttles for students, faculty and staff. Students who are involved in community-based learning and charitable work may have access to transportation at the Center for Social Concerns.